To Please God’s Heart

to-please-gods-heart

As a believer, my greatest opportunity and responsibility is to please God’s heart. There’s nothing I should want more.

Recently, I was asked to speak at a fundraising banquet for an awesome new organization located here on Indy’s west side. (If you haven’t heard of Active Grace, here’s your chance.)

As I prepared for my short devotion and thought about Active Grace’s mission to display the grace of Jesus by meeting the needs of people in our community, Micah 6:8 popped into my mind. And, I realized—of all the wonderful things we could attempt to do to please God’s heart—there is one thing in Scripture that seems to rise to the top of the list.

The following is my outline from that night. As you attempt to please God’s heart, I hope this is an encouragement to you.


What can believers do that most pleases God’s heart?

Is it heartfelt worship? In Psalm 100, the psalmist exhorts Israel to come before the lord with gladness, joyful songs, thanksgiving, and praise. Certainly, God is pleased when his people worship him and glorify his name. In fact, he wants us to live the entirety of our lives as a personal act of worship to him. He is worthy of praise.

Is it doctrinal precision? In his first letter to his protégé, the Apostle Paul told Timothy to apply himself to his life and doctrine and that by persisting in that effort he’d save himself and his hearers. God has revealed himself to his people in the Scriptures; they are God-breathed. The Scriptures reveal all we need for life and godliness. If he has revealed himself to us, it stands to reason that his people should invest the mental effort to know him with great precision and to prevent doctrinal error.

Is it personal purity? In the introduction of the Sermon on the Mount, Jesus warned his disciples that unless their righteousness surpassed that of the religious leaders of their time, they wouldn’t enter the kingdom of heaven. God, who is holy, created us to bear his holy image. Without a doubt, God wills his people to put off sin and to put on his holiness.

Is it possible that all three of these—whether separate or combined—somehow fall short when it comes to pleasing our Heavenly Father? Almost in exasperation, [biblegateway passage=”Micah 6:6-8″ display=”the prophet Micah”] reflects this struggle:

With what shall I come before the Lord
    and bow down before the exalted God?
Shall I come before him with burnt offerings,
    with calves a year old?
Will the Lord be pleased with thousands of rams,
    with ten thousand rivers of olive oil?
Shall I offer my firstborn for my transgression,
    the fruit of my body for the sin of my soul?

The answer to these rhetorical questions, of course, is that none of these (in any amount) will suffice for one who desires to stand in the Lord’s presence. Not glad, heartfelt worship alone. Not doctrinal precision alone. Not even a spotless heart.

Well, then, what can believers do that most pleases his heart?

Micah continues with the answer to the question:

He has shown you, O mortal, what is good. And what does the Lord require of you? To act justly and to love mercy and to walk humbly with your God.

Justice. Mercy. Devotion. God is most pleased when his people worship him by showing justice, by being merciful, and by walking humbly with him.

Over and over again, in God’s Word, he demonstrates his love for people on the margins of society, those who are oppressed by the powerful, those who are systemically deprived of justice, the poor who cannot provide for themselves, the sick who are in need of healing and hope, widows with no one to care for them, and orphans who are abandoned and alone.

Why is God so interested in these people? He created them. They bear his image. And, they are precisely the people who most easily recognize their need for him, for his provision, and for the salvation that can only come from him.

And, these are precisely the people God consistently urges believers to protect, to provide for, to honor, to welcome with glad hearts, and to love. This truth is so pervasive in Scripture that Micah can equate the act of providing justice to others with true worship, the showing of mercy with doing God’s will, and both as central to a thriving relationship with him—as devotion and as worship, pleasing to him.

To exploit the fatherless is to invite God’s wrath:

Do not move an ancient boundary stone or encroach on the fields of the fatherless, for their Defender is strong; he will take up their case against you, ([biblegateway passage=”Proverbs 23:10-11″]).

God defends those who are most defenseless and calls his people to do the same:

He defends the cause of the fatherless and the widow, and loves the foreigner residing among you, giving them food and clothing, ([biblegateway passage=”Deuteronomy 10:18″]).

God calls us to be active in showing his grace:

Learn to do right; seek justice. Defend the oppressed. Take up the cause of the fatherless; plead the case of the widow, ([biblegateway passage=”Isaiah 1:17″]).

He wants us to show kindness to the needy:

Whoever oppresses the poor shows contempt for their Maker, but whoever is kind to the needy honors God, ([biblegateway passage=”Proverbs 14:31″]).

Providing for the poor is tied to spiritual blessings and curses:

Those who give to the poor will lack nothing, but those who close their eyes to them receive many curses, ([biblegateway passage=”Proverbs 28:27″]).

Perhaps all of this is so true of our heavenly Father because of what he did in and through Jesus Christ:

For you know the grace of our Lord Jesus Christ, that though he was rich, yet for your sake he became poor, so that you through his poverty might become rich, ([biblegateway passage=”2 Corinthians 8:9″]).

It’s no coincidence that James, Jesus’ own half-brother, summarized this issue so well. What is most pleasing to the Father?

Religion that God our Father accepts as pure and faultless is this: to look after orphans and widows in their distress and to keep oneself from being polluted by the world, ([biblegateway passage=”James 1:27″]).

When I first heard about Active Grace, I became so excited. I immediately thought of Micah’s words. And, I knew that God would continue to do amazing things in and through this organization because I could see that what was so close to their heart is precisely what is closest to God’s heart: caring for the poor.

Once again, let’s hear Micah’s words:

He has shown you, O mortal, what is good. And what does the Lord require of you? To act justly and to love mercy and to walk humbly with your God.


Do you want to please God’s heart?

God is most pleased with his people when we’re most focused on bringing justice and mercy to those who most need it and when we humbly walk with him.

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